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Welcome to the EGERA project!

Effective Gender Equality in Research and the Academia

The Project EGERA

EGERA intends to promote a full set of measures to achieve gender equality and fight gender-based stereotypes in research and the academia.
EGERA is a tool for achieving two overarching objectives:

  • Gender equality in research and higher education
  • Bringing a gender perspective in research contents and outputs

EGERA pursues both an ambitious and pragmatical objective by tackling the opacity of recruitment and appraisal procedures, gender bias in evaluation and practices which contribute to slow down women's careers. A Europe-scale project EGERA brings together 8 research and higher education institutions from 7 EU member states + Turkey.
Actions to be undertaken by respective partners shall to be also understood as a whole EGERA shall communicate a spirit of innovation, transparency and openness EGERA will constitute a label of equality, fairness and excellence.

Latest News and Events

EGERA meeting - January 2016 (UAB)  

GenderTime International Conference 2016

The aim of the GenderTime project is to identify and implement the best systemic approach to increase the participation and career advancement of women researchers. The goal of the Conference is not only promotion of the results of this and similar projects to the wide audience, but also gathering together numerous prominent scientists in the field as well as potential target beneficiaries of the projects' results. 

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An  Interview with Agnés Hubert

"In gender equality we have many arguments in our favour; now it is time to actually make policy"

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The High Gender Equality Council

The French President François Hollande established at the Elysées Palace, the High Gender Equality Council for a second mandate of 3 years, and mentioned in his discourse: 

"It is not acceptable, that gender segregation persists in STEMs or engineering. It is not acceptable, that too few women make their way at the head of large research organizations".